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Albert Bichot Chambertin Grand Cru 2012 (2772)
  

Albert Bichot Chambertin Grand Cru 2012 (2772)

France - Burgundy - Cote de Nuits - Gevrey-Chambertin
Pinot Noir

Neil Martin - The Wine Advocate 30 October 2015: 

 

The run of Chambertin Clos-de-Bèze offers some dazzling highlights. Here, the Armand Rousseau hit a homerun with a startlingly elegant, complex 2012 whose only downside is its current market price. The silver and bronze medals went to two stalwarts, perhaps surprising to some: the impressive Clos-de-Bèze from Chanson and then the same from Joseph Drouhin that probably has more longevity. I would not kick either out of bed the morning after. Beyond these three, the sentiment was that the Clos-de-Bèze did not quite fulfill expectations, whereas that clearly was not the case for the Chambertins.
I would rather not regurgitate the cliché, whereby praise is lavished by dint of grandeur; for example: it's Chambertin, so it must be good. Not necessarily. Yet the flight of Chambertin was akin to a procession of kings dressed in fabulous robes, marching into a palace and without a word, showing just who is boss in this appellation. It started with a very regal 2012 Chambertin from Rossignol-Trapet, whose wines are so much better than they once were and yet remain relatively well priced. Then the Armand Rousseau upped the ante further with a Chambertin that shimmered with tension and poise...but hold the front page...the third bottle was even better!
"Who could be better than Rousseau in 2012?" you ask incredulously.
I suspect few will answer: "Why, Domaine du Clos Frantin a.k.a. Albert Bichot," but wow, this is just a stunning expression of Chambertin. And before you cart me off to the asylum, yes, it did garner the highest average score from the group of tasters and won by quite some distance. 
Everything you know is wrong, eh?

The run of Chambertin Clos-de-Bèze offers some dazzling highlights. Here, the Armand Rousseau hit a homerun with a startlingly elegant, complex 2012 whose only downside is its current market price. The silver and bronze medals went to two stalwarts, perhaps surprising to some: the impressive Clos-de-Bèze from Chanson and then the same from Joseph Drouhin that probably has more longevity. I would not kick either out of bed the morning after. Beyond these three, the sentiment was that the Clos-de-Bèze did not quite fulfill expectations, whereas that clearly was not the case for the Chambertins.


I would rather not regurgitate the cliché, whereby praise is lavished by dint of grandeur; for example: it's Chambertin, so it must be good. Not necessarily. Yet the flight of Chambertin was akin to a procession of kings dressed in fabulous robes, marching into a palace and without a word, showing just who is boss in this appellation. It started with a very regal 2012 Chambertin from Rossignol-Trapet, whose wines are so much better than they once were and yet remain relatively well priced. Then the Armand Rousseau upped the ante further with a Chambertin that shimmered with tension and poise...but hold the front page...the third bottle was even better!

"Who could be better than Rousseau in 2012?" you ask incredulously.

I suspect few will answer: "Why, Domaine du Clos Frantin a.k.a. Albert Bichot," but wow, this is just a stunning expression of Chambertin. And before you cart me off to the asylum, yes, it did garner the highest average score from the group of tasters and won by quite some distance. Everything you know is wrong, eh?

 

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Professional Reviews

WA-NM
97
Wine Advocate - Neal Martin

Tasted blind at the annual "Burgfest" tasting in Beaune. The 2012 Chambertin Grand Cru from Domaine du Clos Frantin (Albert Bichot) has a dense, fruit-driven bouquet that does not possess the detail of Rousseau's Chambertin 2012. Wild strawberry mingles with cranberry and dried orange peel notes that gain intensity in the glass, but not quite the precision. The palate is medium-bodied with fine tannin, citrus fresh in the mouth with touches of blood orange. Perhaps the true quality of this wine is unveiled because it is far superior than the recalcitrant nose. There is a touch of bitterness on the finish, but that merely lends this Chambertin tension. Extraordinarily long and vital, this was one of the huge surprises of the blind tasting. 

 
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Albert Bichot

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